Examining the Sexual Disparity in STAR WARS

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Sex in the Prequels and Yes, Even The Clone Wars

George Lucas was again at the helm for the prequel trilogy. He also worked hand in hand with Dave Filoni on The Clone Wars animated series. And he was right back at it. I suppose clothing is constricting for a female Jedi Master. (<– Note: Sarcasm.) Look no further than Aayla Secura, who in her death scene still flashed some bare midriff and substantial cleavage:

Jedi Master Aayla Secura in ‘Revenge of the Sith’. (Image: Disney/Lucasfilm)

Even Natalie Portman showed off her midsection, multiple times. She did so in formal Naboo attire, but it was, let’s face it, an almost violent sexuality displayed in Attack of the Clones. It was then that a nexu creature ripped Padme’s top in two to expose her toned abs to the audience.

Padme with her midriff exposed in ‘Attack of the Clones’. (Image: Disney/Lucasfilm)

Admittedly, there was a touch of male sexuality in the prequels, albeit in one, singular bedroom scene. Anakin awakens from a nightmare and sits up in bed to reveal his bare chest. But… unless I missed something, that’s it. The ladies got Hayden Christensen and his shaved chest for all of about fifteen seconds of screen time in Revenge of the Sith at best. The sexual disparity in Star Wars remained.

A little something for the ladies? Shirtless Anakin in ‘Revenge of the Sith’. (Image: Disney/Lucasfilm)

It doesn’t end there, however. Recently I wrote about how Boba Fett actor Daniel Logan claimed Disney cancelled The Clone Wars because it was too “graphic”. While I don’t believe that was the real reason for cancellation, I do see his point. The episode entitled “The Deserter” is a prime example:

Even cartoons aren’t immune to Star Wars sexuality. (Image: Disney/Lucasfilm)

There’s no question that a nearly-topless Twi’lek is pretty racy for cartoons. So why do it? The answer is simple: because George Lucas was still catering to what he perceived, rightly or wrongly, as a predominately male audience.

So how do the newer films address the sexual disparity in Star Wars?